Control and the foundational theories of modern life sciences

The original theories of evolution by natural selection and the genetic basis of heredity were built from language, arguments, evidence, and practices of controlled breeding in agriculture and the laboratory.  What does it mean that understandings of the diversity of life—its changes and its continuities—were formed in a crucible of human control of biological materials?  What does it mean that this question has not been given much attention in the history and philosophy of the life sciences?

Of course, there are innumerable episodes and currents in the history and philosophy of heredity that invite further inquiry.  One response to the two questions above would be for me to get to work, to research and write on them myself.  Another response would be to try to stimulate others to explore assumptions about control built into analyses and models of variation and change and to make their own contributions.  On both fronts, stay tuned…

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2 thoughts on “Control and the foundational theories of modern life sciences

  1. Pingback: Underlying heterogeneity and heritability II: What can researchers do on the basis of knowing a trait’s heritability if the genetic and environmental factors underlying the observed trait are heterogeneous? « Intersecting Processes

  2. Pingback: The path to personalized medicine may run through social stereotyping « Intersecting Processes

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