Science in a Changing World initiatives

“Science in a Changing World” (SICW) is a constellation of initiatives aimed at “facilitating learning & teaching innovation, research & public engagement, discussion & collaboration regarding scientific developments & social change.” SICW is linked to what is now a Master’s program of the same name at the University of Massachusetts at Boston (UMass Boston), but the decentered approach to SICW infrastructure building began developing much earlier in the work of its coordinator, Peter Taylor. This statement sets the scene with a brief account of the principles that animate the decentered approach, describes the prehistory before UMass Boston and the strands that make up SICW, and closes with some remarks about the ways that this kind of infrastructure development follows from and feeds into STS analyses. (read more)

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Paper proposals invited for “Most workshops are dysfunctional–This one wasn’t”

“Most workshops are dysfunctional–This one wasn’t” Interpreting, enacting, changing organized multi-person collaborative processes
This panel at the EASST meetings in July invites presentations or other interactive processes that explore various aspects of interpreting, enacting, changing organized multi-person collaborative processes—functional or dysfunctional; our own in STS as well as those of the researchers we study.

Why study fractions?

I googled the question “Why study fractions?” (for reasons I describe later) and found a study (reported in Swanbrow 2012) that invites critical thinking at two levels: 1) the assumptions, evidence, and reasoning warrant scrutiny; and 2) what is it that allows researchers and policy makers to proceed as if there are no alternative interpretations to be drawn from the study?

via (read more)

Lives in STS “as a series of failed political experiments”

This open panel for the August/September 2018 meetings of 4S (the Society for Social Studies of Science) invites exploration of how to make sense of the biographical changes in changing contexts of radical scientists and of critics of science since the 1970s, as well as of STS interpreters of science influenced by them.
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Dynamic flux

What might we see if we translated what is entailed in the non-equilibrium, “dynamic flux” view of ecology (Pickett 2013 and others) into the realm of human actions?
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Teaching for Epidemiological Literacy: Description, Prescription, and Critical Thinking

I just completed an article that describes contrasting ideas for a sequence of topics as presented to students in a graduate course on epidemiological literacy. Because it could be the first draft of something more developed, I share the abstract and invite feedback.
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Food for thought (if you don’t insist on pure foods)

Source: Food for thought (if you don’t insist on pure foods)