Tag Archives: sex

What has Nature vs. Nurture got to do with Nature vs. Nurture? IV

Previous posts (1, 2, 3) considered the connection between two different Nature-Nurture issues: the matter of fixity versus flexibility in the development of traits in individuals over their life course and the relative degrees of hereditary versus environmental influences on the variation of the trait between versus within groups? (“Groups” here refers to males or females, but the question might be extended to socially defined racial or socio-economic groups.)  Continue reading

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What has Nature vs. Nurture got to do with Nature vs. Nurture? III

previous post considered the connection between two different Nature-Nurture issues: the matter of fixity versus flexibility in the development of traits in individuals over their life course and the relative degrees of hereditary versus environmental influences on the variation of the trait between versus within groups? (“Groups” here refers to males or females, but the question might be extended to socially defined racial or socio-economic groups.)  Continue reading

What has Nature vs. Nurture got to do with Nature vs. Nurture? II

The previous post asked about the connection between two different Nature-Nurture issues: the matter of fixity versus flexibility in the development of traits in individuals over their life course and the relative degrees of hereditary versus environmental influences on the variation of the trait between versus within groups? (“Groups” here refers to males or females, but the question might be extended to socially defined racial or socio-economic groups.)  Continue reading

What has Nature vs. Nurture got to do with Nature vs. Nurture?

How difficult is it to change the typical distributions of a trait, such as aggression, substance abuse, suicide attempts, as the distributions differ between males and females? Nature versus Nurture debates build off this question in two ways. One is the matter of fixity versus flexibility in the development of traits in individuals over their life course. The other is the relative degrees of hereditary versus environmental influences on the variation of the trait between versus within groups. (“Groups” here refers to males or females, but the question might be extended to socially defined racial or socio-economic groups.) What have these two Nature-Nurture issues got to do with each other? Continue reading

50 whys to look for genes: 46. Understand sex differences

Most people who identify as men have an X and a Y chromosome, while most people who identify as women have two X chromosomes.  Understanding what genes are on the X versus the Y chromosome and when/how those genes are activated over the life course (beginning prenatally) is a way to examine the basis of sex differences.  Similarly, for the different systems of sex determination across the animal kingdom (wikipedia). Continue reading

50 whys to look for genes: 38. Select sex of the baby

Prenatal tests can determine the chromosomal sex of the fetus as early as 10 weeks into the pregnancy.  If the fetus is not of the desired sex, it can be aborted.

Complications

1. Selecting the sex of the baby happens by rejecting the fetuses that are not of that sex.

2. That selective abortion by sex is happening even when illegal is evident, for example, in the sex ratio of second children in India.  The parents take their chances the first time, but, if they have a girl, enough parents resort to sex-selective abortion that the sex ratio of second children is skewed towards male babies (Manchanda et al. 2011).

3. The social implications of this imbalance could be significant, if that is not the case already (e.g., Hesketh & Min 2012, 2011 magazine article about China).

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(Introduction to this series of posts)