Tag Archives: genotype

Genotype-phenotype distinction, with schemas

A revised entry on the genotype-phenotype distinction has been submitted to is soon to be published by the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. A major difficulty we had preparing this revision followed once it was noted that philosophers write on the genotype-phenotype relationship, not on the genotype-phenotype distinction. Continue reading

Making sense of Genotype-Phenotype Distinction, another version (7)

Comments welcome by anyone interested to read the revised draft, which begins:

The predominant current-day meaning of genotype is some relevant part of the DNA passed to the organism by its parents. The phenotype is the physical and behavioral traits of the organism, for example, size and shape, metabolic activities, and patterns of movement. The distinction between them is especially important in evolutionary theory, where the survival and mating of organisms depends on their traits, but it is the DNA, held to be unaffected by the development of the traits over the life course, that is transmitted to the next generation. Continue reading

Making sense of Genotype-Phenotype Distinction, another version 6

The revised draft begins:

The predominant current-day meaning of genotype is some relevant part of the whole genome, the DNA passed to the organism by its parents. The phenotype is the physical and behavioral characteristics of the organism, for example, size and shape, metabolic activities, and patterns of movement.   The distinction is especially important in evolutionary theory, where the survival and mating of organisms depends on their traits, but it is the DNA, held to be unaffected by the development of the traits over the life course, that is transmitted to the next generation.

However: Continue reading

Making sense of genotype-phenotype distinctions, version 5

The predominant current-day meaning of genotype is the DNA passed to the organism by its parents. The phenotype is the physical and behavioral characteristics of the organism, for example, size and shape, metabolic activities, and patterns of movement. The distinction between the terms seems straightforward, but their use opens up a range of conceptual and methodological questions. Continue reading

Making sense of genotype-phenotype distinctions, version 4

The predominant current-day meaning of genotype is the DNA passed to the organism by its parents at the organism’s conception. The phenotype is the physical and behavioral characteristics of the organism, for example, size and shape, metabolic activities, and patterns of movement. To examine the relationship between the genotype and the phenotype is to be drawn into investigations that include: Continue reading

Making sense of genotype-phenotype distinctions, version 3

Two foundational developments of modern biology—the theories of evolution by natural selection and the genetic basis of heredity—were built from the language, arguments, evidence, and practices of controlled breeding in agriculture and the laboratory.   The genotype-phenotype distinction—or, rather, a series of different meanings of those terms—provides an entry point into the implications of that genesis and subsequent developments. Complexities get suppressed, which engenders new problems and complexity-recovering responses. Many of these are raised or implied by Johannsen (1911), where the terms genotype and phenotype were introduced to English-language readers. Continue reading

Making sense of genotype-phenotype distinctions, version 2

The genotype-phenotype distinction—or, rather, the array of such distinctions—provides an entry point into the implications of the two foundational developments of modern biology—the theories of evolution by natural selection and the genetic basis of heredity—being built from the language, arguments, evidence, and practices of controlled breeding in agriculture and the laboratory.   Complexities get suppressed, which engenders new problems and complexity-recovering efforts. Continue reading