Developing theory about community-based participatory research I

This series of posts presents an exploratory research proposal that begins from two observations:

1) Improvement in the health of disadvantaged or under-served minorities does not necessarily require community-based participatory research; population health measures may be equally or more suitable [1];

2) Participation in community-based participatory research does not come naturally to members of those communities or to concerned health researchers [2].

Four Questions

1.  In what way(s) do we link community-based participatory research (CBPR) to Health Disparities (HD)?

This question needs to be addressed because, as noted above, improvement in the health of disadvantaged or under-served minorities does not necessarily require community-based participatory research.  Population health measures, such as pollution regulations that reduce the airborne particulate burden in urban areas, may be equally or more suitable [1].  The arguments offered for making a CBPR-HD linkage include: helping to identify health problems; cooperation in data collection and retention in longituidinal follow-up; acknowledgement of needs of disadvantaged; and others (see [4] for a longer list and discussion).  The linkage that these posts promote is that CBPR can address HD by engaging community members in improving their own health and in the social determinants of their health.  (To be continued)

References

[1] Rose, G. (1985). “Sick individuals and sick populations.” International Journal of Epidemiology 14: 32-38.  Lynch, J. (2007), “Relevant Risk, Revolution and Revisiting Rose: Causes of Population Levels and Social Inequalities in Health,” http://www.sph.umn.edu/research/hdwg/engagement/risk.asp (viewed 30 Sept. 2009)

[2] For a review of the politics of participation and participation rhetoric, see Peters, P. (1996), “”Who’s local here?”  The politics of participation in development,” Cultural Survival Quarterly 20(3): 22-60.

[4] Minkler, M. (2005). “Community-Based Research Partnerships:  Challenges and Opportunities.” Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine 82(2, supplement 2): ii3-ii12; Viswanathan, M., A. Ammerman, et al. (2004). Community-Based Participatory Research: Assessing the Evidence. Summary, Evidence Report/Technology Assessment: Number 99. Rockville, MD, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (Publication Number 04-E022-1).

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3 thoughts on “Developing theory about community-based participatory research I

  1. Pingback: Developing theory about community-based participatory research II « Intersecting Processes

  2. Pingback: Developing theory about community-based participatory research III « Intersecting Processes

  3. Pingback: Developing theory about community-based participatory research IV « Intersecting Processes

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